Kids

A Day at Day Camp

The other week the kids at Shaloh House went to the Brighton police station to drop off thank-you cards and cookies they'd baked for the officers. I tagged along and got to spend an hour or so afterwards just taking photos of the kids doing their usual day camp thing: games of Mafia, pool time and so many piggyback rides.

Running theory: girls' friendships with each other are maybe the most fun.

Wild n' Crazy Kids

A few weeks back I got asked to shoot a 5th grade graduation party, which would have:

  1. a mechanical bull
  2. a swimming pool
  3. a trampoline
  4. sno-cones and ice cream cake
  5. 50 twelve-year-olds, recently released from school

And the last item would be: me, obviously I am going to be there; this sounds amazing. What follows is mostly photos of kids gleefully falling: into inflated air, nylon, and kool-aid colored water. I long for the days when I could fall like that.

I've been really loving taking pictures of kids lately; even or especially in the din of wilder events (and the sudden concern; did I zip up my camera bag, the one that's fifteen feet away from the pool?) I feel like they make everything great. Their hearts are on their sleeves at all times. They're like explosive little ids, expressing exactly what they feel in the moment they feel it. And to them, I'm completely invisible; I don't even have to tiptoe.

This weekend my husband and I went to some fireworks in a neighboring suburb with friends, one of whom has a 10 year old son. "Does having a kid basically let you relive childhood?" I asked him. "The Fourth of July used to be amazing to me. Now it's, you know, great; but I can't seem to recapture that breathtaking endless magic it used to be. Do you live vicariously through someone who is experiencing that?"

"You can," he said. "Most people don't. It's hard to remember to do it."

I don't know if I'd be able to as a parent dealing with the logistics of keeping another tiny person fed and safe. But as a photographer who just shows up for a few hours to watch, it's my favorite part.

Grand Chanukah Hummer Parade

A couple of weeks ago I was asked to shoot an event for the Shaloh House Jewish Day School in Brighton. I'd shot a "mock wedding" for them the past summer (those images are incredibly fun, and coming soon) and loved how all-in everyone was with a wonderful variety of silliness and play concerning real-life dyanmics I had never seen before. I knew regardless of the details I would have a great time shooting it and committed immediately. "What's the event?" I asked the rabbi, day-of.

It was just a couple of hours before I needed to be out the door when he sent me a link to the Grand Chanukah Hummer Parade.

Grand Chanukah Hummer Parade

Grand Chanukah Hummer Parade

Grand Chanukah Hummer Parade

Grand Chanukah Hummer Parade

Grand Chanukah Hummer Parade

Grand Chanukah Hummer Parade

Grand Chanukah Hummer Parade

Grand Chanukah Hummer Parade

Grand Chanukah Hummer Parade

Grand Chanukah Hummer Parade

Grand Chanukah Hummer Parade

Grand Chanukah Hummer Parade

Grand Chanukah Hummer Parade

Grand Chanukah Hummer Parade

Grand Chanukah Hummer Parade

Grand Chanukah Hummer Parade

Grand Chanukah Hummer Parade

Grand Chanukah Hummer Parade

Grand Chanukah Hummer Parade

There was rowdy facepainting and balloon-making in the basement, and piles of powdered donuts upstairs. Mayor Martin Walsh arrived to much fanfare to help light the giant menorah. There were heartfelt speeches, humemr oil-use jokes, convivial handshaking, and accordion music — before all of the kids crammed into their giant brightly menorah-lit Hummer limosines to ride in a parade throughout the city.

The all-in-ness was inescapable and contagious.